Glossary

1035 Exchange

A method of exchanging insurance-related assets without triggering a taxable event. Cash-value life insurance policies and annuity contracts are two products that may qualify for a 1035 exchange.

401(k) Plan

A qualified retirement plan available to eligible employees of companies. 401(k) plans allow eligible employees to defer taxation on a specific percentage of their income that is to be put toward retirement savings; taxes on this deferred income and on any earnings the account generates are deferred until the funds are withdrawn—normally in retirement. Employers may match part or all of an employee’s contributions. Employees may be responsible for investment selections and enjoy the direct tax savings.

401(k) Loan

A loan taken from the assets within a 401(k) account. 401(k) loans charge interest and are normally paid back through payroll deductions. If the borrower leaves an employer before a 401(k) loan has been repaid, the full amount of the loan is generally due. If the borrower fails to repay the loan, it is considered a distribution, and ordinary income taxes may be due, along with any applicable tax penalties.

403(b) Plan

A 403(b) plan is similar to a 401(k). A 403(b) is a qualified retirement plan available to employees of non-profit and government organizations.

    • Management Fee
    • Marital Deduction
    • Market Risk
    • Market Timing
    • Maturity
    • Medicaid
    • Medicare
    • Money Market Fund
    • Municipal Bond
    • Municipal Bond Fund
    • Mutual Fund
    The cost of having assets professionally managed. This fee is normally a fixed percentage of the fund’s asset value; terms of the fee are disclosed in the prospectus.
    A provision of the tax code that allows an individual to transfer an unlimited amount of assets to his or her spouse at any time—including upon the individual’s death—without triggering a tax liability.
    The risk that an entire market will decline, reducing the value of the investments in it without regard to other factors. This is also known as Systemic Risk.
    An investment philosophy under which investors buy and sell securities in an attempt to profit from short-term price fluctuations.
    The date on which a debt security comes due for payment and on which an investor’s principal is due to be repaid.
    The federal government’s health program for eligible individuals and families with low income and resources. It is means tested, meaning those who apply for benefits must demonstrate they have need.
    The federal government’s health program for individuals aged 65 and over and for individuals who have certain disabilities or end-stage renal disease.
    A mutual fund that invests in assets that are easily converted into cash and which have a low risk of price fluctuation. This may include money market holdings, Treasury bills, and commercial paper. Money held in money market funds is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Money market funds seek to preserve the value of your investment at $1.00 a share. However, it is possible to lose money by investing in a money market fund.
    A debt security issued by a state, county, city, or other political entity (such as a school district) to raise public funds for special projects. The income from municipal bonds is normally exempt from federal income taxes. It may also be exempt from state income taxes in the state in which the municipal bond is issued. Bond prices rise and fall daily. Municipal bonds are subject to a variety of risks, including adjustments in interest rates, call risk, market conditions, and default risk. Some municipal bonds may be subject to the federal alternative minimum tax. When interest rates rise, bond prices generally will fall. Certain municipal bonds may be difficult to sell. A municipal bond issuer may be unable to make interest or principal payments, which may lead to the issuer defaulting on the bond. If this occurs, the municipal bond may have little or no value. If a bond is purchased at a premium, it may result in realized losses. It’s possible that the interest on a municipal bond may be determined to be taxable after purchase.
    A mutual fund offered by an investment company which specifically invests in municipal bonds. Mutual fund balances are subject to fluctuation in value and market risk. Shares, when redeemed, may be worth more or less than their original cost. Mutual funds are sold only by prospectus. Individuals are encouraged to consider the charges, risks, expenses, and investment objectives carefully before investing. A prospectus containing this and other information about the investment company can be obtained from your financial professional. Read it carefully before you invest or send money.
    A pooled investment account offered by an investment company. Mutual funds pool the monies of many investors and then invest the money to pursue the fund’s stated objectives. The resulting portfolio of investments is managed by the investment company. Mutual fund balances are subject to fluctuation in value and market risk. Shares, when redeemed, may be worth more or less than their original cost. Mutual funds are sold only by prospectus. Individuals are encouraged to consider the charges, risks, expenses, and investment objectives carefully before investing. A prospectus containing this and other information about the investment company can be obtained from your financial professional. Read it carefully before you invest or send money.